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Accelerated Light Fading Test Results

Accelerated Light Fading Test Results Sample # AaI_00900_SN00 00 Megalux-hours completed Conservation Display Rating * Lower Exposure Limit Upper Exposure limit 6 86 (Megalux hours) (Megalux hours) * Please
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Accelerated Light Fading Test Results Sample # AaI_00900_SN00 00 Megalux-hours completed Conservation Display Rating * Lower Exposure Limit Upper Exposure limit 6 86 (Megalux hours) (Megalux hours) * Please read document AaI_009_08_TA-0.pdf, An Overview of the AaI&A Conservation Display Ratings, located on the Documents page of the AaI&A website for an explanation of the conservation display ratings. Document #: AaI_00900_SN00Lf.pdf Rev: March, 0 Test Print Prepared by: AaI&A Member Copyright 0. This report has been prepared for the exclusive use of members of. Members may share this information with other members, friends, colleagues, and individual clients. It may also be distributed to groups for educational purposes (classes, lectures, educational seminars. etc). However, all contents including but not limited to Conservation Display Ratings may not be posted to web sites and may not be reproduced or distributed for corporate research, marketing, or other promotional purposes without written permission from. For more information please contact: About this Report This report contains light fastness information about a single test print produced by a specific digital printing system. System refers to all hardware, software, and materials used to make the finished print. The hardware, software, material components, and printmaker s skills contribute to the final image quality and image permanence. The tested sample is made with current or recently discontinued stocks of commercially available products unless otherwise stated. Each sample has been prepared by or one of its members in accordance with customary print making practices unless otherwise noted. The sample may also contain additional finishing materials such as overcoats and laminates which are also noted when used. Finally, the sample has been tested under standardized conditions that are defined on the Sample Description page (see page ). AaI&A makes every effort to ensure but cannot guarantee that the samples are properly identified and documented and that test results are accurate. For this reason, AaI&A also strives to test independently produced sample replicates in order to increase sampling confidence and to provide information on process variability. Please compare the results in this report to replicate test samples when the data become available. Understanding the Test Results AaI_StandardColorSet(v)forSRGB.tif The magnitude and visual appearance of fading depends not only on the chosen printing system but the chosen image as well. In other words, different images are comprised of different colors, and the fading relationships between those colors dictate how the image will look as it fades. The sample print in this test report was made by reproducing the digital image shown on the left. It contains 0 standard colors. of the colors are colorimetrically matched to the Macbeth ColorChecker chart viewed under D0 illumination. The remaining six colors supplement the ColorChecker array with four additional skin tone colors, one patch for paper white, and another for maximum black. The additional colors also round out the distribution of L* lightness values in the test target. Information about the fading characteristics of the product is provided in three ways: ) You can visually assess the fading. The target images reproduced in this report are digitally reconstructed from the spectrally measured color data rather than scanning or otherwise reproducing the physical print by conventional techniques. This method ensures a colorimetrically accurate representation of the print appearance as the print fades. A calibrated monitor is recommended to experience the best possible reproduction of the test sample appearance. The side-by-side presentation of the target images simulates looking at the light-exposed print along side a perfect duplicate of the unexposed original print. The Before/After Layer mode takes advantage of Adobe Reader Layer technology. Toggle the Before/After layer on and off using the layers feature of Adobe Reader to directly switch between the light exposed print colors and the initial print colors for the image located on the right side of each page. Also, use Adobe Reader s full screen mode to cycle through the pages and animate the fading. ) I* Color and tonal accuracy scores are reported. This report includes I* metric scores that compare the color and tonal relationships of the light exposed samples to the color and tonal relationships existing in the original print prior to light exposure. Perfect I* scores of 00% can be approached when no significant fading occurs. Average scores above 90% generally indicate excellent retention of original quality, 80% good, 70% fair, etc., but your conclusions may vary depending on your image quality requirements. I* color rates the retained color accuracy (hue and chroma) while I* tone rates the retained tonal accuracy (lightness and contrast). The score is on a percentile scale where 00% is a perfect match between the comparison image (e.g., after light exposure) and the reference image (e.g., before any light exposure). 0% I* color means no color accuracy is left. 0% I* tone means essentially no tonality remains and all image information content is lost. Negative I* values have significance as well and contribute to the average I* score when they occur. Negative I* color values mean false color has occurred, for example, when a skin tone turns green or a neutral gray becomes distinctly colorful. Negative I* tone scores mean visual contrast between colors has become inverted (i.e., like the tonal relationships in a photographic film negative). Serious image quality problems must arise before false colors and/or tones appear. For more information on the I* metric, please refer to the AaI&A web site. ) Color changes are also reported using the classic color difference model, E. Note that E values lose perceptual scaling significance when they become large (e.g., ). Also, the E equation does not unambiguously measure changes in image contrast. This limitation is generally not a problem for paints and textiles, but can be a serious oversight when evaluating photographic images. It was a major reason behind the development of the I* metric. Page Sample Description Printer: Epson Stylus Pro 800 Ink: Epson OEM (K Ultrachrome) Paper: Hahnemühle Photo Rag 08 gsm Sample #: AaI_00900_SN00 Test Print Prepared by: AaI&A Member Test Image: AaI_StandardColorSet(v)forSRGB.tif RIP/Driver settings: PS/CS, Photoshop manages colors, print mode = AccuPhoto HD (6 bit), Color Mode = Off (no color adjustment) Resoltuion = SuperPhoto-0 dpi, High speed off (See Figure, page ). Media Setting: Velvet Fine Art Paper AaI_StandardColorSet(v)forSRGB.tif Printed: March, 009 Original print colors measured on: May, 009 Test started on: May, 009 Profile: HFA_Eps800_MK_PhotoRag.icc Rendering Intent: Perceptual with BPC Profile type: Generic ( Profile Creation Software: n.a. Paper White Color (UV included versus UV excluded) and Maximum Printed Black Optical Brighteners present? yes** UV inc UV exc UV inc UV exc UV inc UV exc Maximum Paper White (no colorants printed) () L*, a*, b* respectively () Calculated differences, especially for b*, indicate the role and magnitude of fluorescence on original paper color Maximum Printed black (UV included) L* = 9. a* = 0. b* =. Light Source: Phillips Colortone F0T/C0 Filter/Glazing: Sample framed under Glass* Light Exposure Cycle: 8 hours on, hours off, twice per hours Average Illuminance during on cycle:,0 Lux Average Temperature:.7 C over full test duration,. C during light exposure Average Relative humidity: 8.8%RH full test period, 8.9%RH during light exposure CIELAB measurements: D0 observer, Xrite Gretag/Macbeth Spectrolino/Spectroscan Replicates/Compare to: Replicate: AaI_0090_SN00 full random replicate provided by another AaI&A member. Page Notes/Comments: * The Phillips Colortone F0T/C0 fluorescent light source and ordinary glass picture frame glazing yields UVA content and overall spectral power similar to natural 000 K daylight entering a window and then striking a print that has been framed by standard acrylic glazing rather than ordinary glass. Other light sources and/or different glazing options may yield greater or lesser fade rates (generally, a -x increase in fade rate for direct sunlight compared to UV excluded sources at the same Lux level). The spectral quality of the light can also affect individual colors differently. ** OBAs in paper core, little or none in image receiver layer. Figure Settings Page Table to Convert Megalux-hours of Light Exposure to estimated Years on Display Indoor Light Levels for Print Display Multiply Megalux-hours in test Light Exposure Description Mlux hrs by Lux hours per day 0 Lux hours per day 0 Lux hours per day Kodak Display Years () 8 Lux hours per day 0 Lux hours per day WIR Display Years () Also equals 00 lux for.8 hours per day 000 Lux hours per day 000 Lux hours per day 0,000 Lux hours per day Interior rooms, storage areas, or hallways without windows, illuminated sparingly by artificial lighting Museum Standard display condition Average home illumination level for photos is ~ 60 lux. 90% of all displayed photos do not exceed 0 lux (). Relatively bright home or office. Note the simple : relationship between years on display and Mlux-hr values at this condition. A bright home or commercial office building illumination level is lux. Also, good illumination for color critical viewing and color matching tasks begins at about 00 lux. Commercial Gallery. Also, critical color evaluation standards call for 000 lux and a D0 illumination source. E.g., Sunlight through a window striking print at an angle. South-facing window in U.S.A., e.g., storefront display with photos directly facing window Light levels commonly encountered in the real world fluctuate widely throughout indoor print display environments and produce large variations in how long it takes for artwork to acquire light-induced damage. Use this table as a guide to estimate how many years on display (denoted in red text) it takes to accumulate the light exposure test dosage. Review the test results to decide which Megalux-hour dose has caused fading to your level of concern (e.g., just noticeable, easily noticeable, objectionable, etc.). Then choose the print display description that best represents how your print is likely to be displayed. You may want to obtain a lux meter and make some measurements in your own display environment! Note that as the years of display time increase, light-induced fading can be eclipsed by other serious aging mechanisms such as fading and/or staining caused by heat, humidity, and air pollutants. Mould damage can also occur at high humidity. Even when colorants remain water fast, direct contact with liquids may result in physical deformation and staining of the substrate. Also, temperature and especially humidity cycling can cause physical cracks and/or flaking, etc. Handling damage such as scratching, abrasion, tears and creases, and catastrophic damage by smoke, fire, flood, etc., also degrade print quality over time. Thus, as illumination levels are reduced other forms of degradation take on greater proportion of risk and may appear in shorter time intervals. () Eastman Kodak has cited this exposure condition and 90% confidence limit as a rationale for estimating print fading times of traditional color photo materials in typical home display environments. For recent light fading claims regarding its line of pigment-based inkjet printers, Kodak has adopted the higher level of 0lux/ hours per day which is also used by Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. (See below). () Wilhelm Imaging Research (WIR) has standardized its light fastness ratings on 0 lux for hours per day in order to estimate the years on display necessary to reach noticeable fading. This average light exposure condition, an assumed 7 F/60%RH temperature and humidity level, and WIR s visually weighted densitometric endpoint criteria set V.0 has become a de facto industry standard for most predictive light fading estimates in the absence of a published International Standards Organization (ISO) test standard. Page 00color /00tone as Measured and at Start of Test A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Zero Megalux-hours of Light Exposure (same as original print colors) Page 99.color 00color /00tone /98.tone 0 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 0 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 6 99.0color 00color /00tone /97.7tone 0 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 0 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 7 98.color 00color /00tone /96.9tone 0 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 0 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 8 97.color 00color /00tone /96.tone 0 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 0 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 9 9.8color 00color /00tone /9.8tone 0 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 0 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 0 9.color 00color /00tone /9.tone 60 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 60 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 9.6color 00color /00tone /9.tone 70 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 70 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 90.8color 00color /00tone /9.8tone 80 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 80 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 89.color 00color /00tone /9.0tone 90 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured to and Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 90 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 87.7color 00color /00tone /9.tone 00 Mlux-hrs Light Original Exposure Print Colors (i.e., after) as Compared Measured and to Original at Start Print of Test Colors (i.e., before) A dark Skin B light Skin C blue sky D foliage E blue flower F bluish green A orange B purplish blue C moderate red D purple E yellow green F orange yellow A blue B green C red D yellow E magenta F cyan A white B neutral C neutral D neutral E neutral F black A paper white B skin highlight L*= C skin highlight L*= D skin shadow L*= E skin shadow L*= F Max Black Average Score for all patches Average Score for the Worst 0% ( lowest scoring patches) Colors at Colors Zero Megalux-hours after 00 Megalux-hours of Light Exposure Page 8.7color 00color /00tone /9.7tone 0 Mlux-
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